Raising Awareness for Human Trafficking

The Marquette Branch of the American Association of University of Women hosted a meeting to raise awareness about human trafficking.

Published in: on October 13, 2013 at 8:14 am  Leave a Comment  
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Abducted Boy Could Face Hard Recovery 6-01-2011 – CBS 5 – KPHO

Abducted Boy Could Face Hard Recovery 6-01-2011 – CBS 5 – KPHO.

Published in: on January 20, 2012 at 8:26 am  Leave a Comment  
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Rugby World Cup ‘magnet for sex traffickers’

Sex traffickers will be targeting next year’s Rugby World Cup as a business opportunity, a visiting anti-trafficking campaigner says.

 

Sex traffickers will be targeting next year’s Rugby World Cup as a business opportunity, a visiting anti-trafficking campaigner says.

New Zealander Judy Boyle, who heads a global trafficking awareness campaign, said traffickers operated wherever there was a demand for their business.

“You think traffickers aren’t smiling about the Rugby World Cup?”

Her concern is being taken seriously by the New Zealand police, which says the risk of trafficking for prostitution was multiplied during big gatherings of people.

Ms Boyle is now based in Athens but has been in Nelson giving a series of trafficking awareness workshops.

She said wherever there was an opportunity to make money, such as an international sporting event, traffickers would be seeing dollar signs.

The International Rugby Board’s head of the Rugby World Cup, Kit McConnell, told a conference in Christchurch this week that the event next year would boost New Zealand’s economy by $1 billion and attract 85,000 visitors.

Though there had not been any prosecutions brought in New Zealand for sex trafficking, Ms Boyle said it was difficult to put numbers on how many people were affected because it was an “invisible crime”.

An estimated 12.3 million adults and children were in forced labour and forced prostitution around the world, according to the annual United States State Department’s Trafficking in Persons report.

The report said it was possible trafficking victims were not being detected in New Zealand.

The country had been a destination for women from Hong Kong, Thailand, Taiwan, China, Malaysia and Eastern Europe trafficked into forced prostitution.

Superintendent Grant O’Fee, who is the commander of police operations for the Rugby World Cup, said his team was conscious of the potential for trafficking crime during the event. “We are aware opportunities exist in any big gatherings especially at an international event like the Rugby World Cup.”

He was constantly in touch with permanent fulltime Interpol staff stationed at police national headquarters regarding cross-border crime. “There are certain things we know are going to happen but that is not to say we don’t ignore the more under the radar sort of stuff.”

Mr O’Fee said a member of his team had met with ECPAT, an international organisation dedicated to ending the trafficking of children for sexual purposes, and the police specialist child exploitation team based in Auckland to make sure they were aware of the potential of the problem.

ECPAT’s New Zealand director, Alan Bell, said it was likely that the sex industry would experience an increase in trade during the Rugby World Cup.

The US report said no research had been conducted to determine the full extent of the trafficking problem in New Zealand.

As well, it did not have a comprehensive anti-trafficking law.

Ms Boyle, who has a Masters degree in education from Harvard, said she would like to see some thorough research done into the extent of the problem in New Zealand.

She began her work campaigning against trafficking 10 years ago when she read an article about a sex worker who had tried to hang herself with her own stockings.

She could not sleep for days.

“It was something I knew nothing about but once you know some things it is very difficult to unknow them.”

She began the No Project as an international awareness campaign to effect change in the next generation.

“This can only be achieved through a well-informed youth population who are encouraged to challenge the attitudes and behaviour of previous generations.”

Ms Boyle said she was disturbed by the invisibility of the industry and its silent endorsement.

“You know where all this goes on? In suburbia, it’s the nice suburban homes in every city around the planet.”

To find out more about the extent of human trafficking visit stopthetraffik.org or mtvexit.org.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING

2.5 million people are in forced labour, including sexual exploitation, at any given time as a result of trafficking.

Fifty-six per cent, or 1.4 million, are in Asia and the Pacific.

Most victims are between 18 and 24, while 95 per cent experience physical or sexual violence.

New Zealand is a destination country for human trafficking from Malaysia, Hong Kong, China and other Asian countries for sexual exploitation.

A multi-agency taskforce is developing a national plan of action to stop people trafficking in New Zealand.

Source: US Department of State Trafficking in Persons Report/Department of Labour

source:http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/news/4012708/Rugby-World-Cup-magnet-for-sex-traffickers

Joran Van Der Sloot Sought in Peru Murder

source:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRZJlTYXx3E&feature=related

Published in: on June 3, 2010 at 5:54 am  Comments (5)  
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Sex Traffic Victim: ‘I Was A Slave’

Those who support an effort to toughen laws on human sex trafficking are making a final push to get the governor to sign a bill sitting on her desk.

 “Robyn,” which is not her real name, said she was treated like a slave.

 “My life was at risk every night. I didn’t know what was going to happen. I had to see a gun at night when I got back to the place I was staying,” she said, trying to hold back tears.

 Robyn, 19, said she was forced into prostitution for three months last year by a 38-year-old man she met online.

 “I felt safe at the time and then one day everything changed. He turned on me. I mean, he changed into a monster,” she said.

 Robyn said she took in between $500 and $1,000 a night working mostly on Chinatown’s streets, but the money was collected by her pimp.

 She said the bill now before the governor would help other women on the street like her by making sex trafficking a felony.

 The city prosecutor’s office supports making sex trafficking a felony, but opposes the bill.

 “It’s going to overlap with our existing statutes. It makes things more complicated, not easier,” said Dennis Dunn, deputy prosecutor.

 Prosecutors said numerous technical aspects of the bill would make it difficult to convict a sex trafficker.

 “I think it’s difficult because part of what needs to be done has nothing to do with legislation. It’s a matter of educating both law enforcement and the public to be aware,” said Dunn.

 Robyn said human sex trafficking is a bigger problem than most people realize.

 “I don’t think people want to know there’s people out there. Young women out there that are still in my position and they need help,” she said.

 Robyn said she’s trying to find a job and wants to go back to school, but she’s still fearful her former pimp will find her.

 Gov. Linda Lingle has until July 6 to sign the bill into law. Supporters of the measure vow to raise the issue again next legislative session if the governor vetoes the bill. Those who support an effort to toughen laws on human sex trafficking are making a final push to get the governor to sign a bill sitting on her desk.

“Robyn,” which is not her real name, said she was treated like a slave.

“My life was at risk every night. I didn’t know what was going to happen. I had to see a gun at night when I got back to the place I was staying,” she said, trying to hold back tears.

Robyn, 19, said she was forced into prostitution for three months last year by a 38-year-old man she met online.

“I felt safe at the time and then one day everything changed. He turned on me. I mean, he changed into a monster,” she said.

Robyn said she took in between $500 and $1,000 a night working mostly on Chinatown’s streets, but the money was collected by her pimp.

She said the bill now before the governor would help other women on the street like her by making sex trafficking a felony.

The city prosecutor’s office supports making sex trafficking a felony, but opposes the bill.

“It’s going to overlap with our existing statutes. It makes things more complicated, not easier,” said Dennis Dunn, deputy prosecutor.

Prosecutors said numerous technical aspects of the bill would make it difficult to convict a sex trafficker.

“I think it’s difficult because part of what needs to be done has nothing to do with legislation. It’s a matter of educating both law enforcement and the public to be aware,” said Dunn.

Robyn said human sex trafficking is a bigger problem than most people realize.

“I don’t think people want to know there’s people out there. Young women out there that are still in my position and they need help,” she said.

Robyn said she’s trying to find a job and wants to go back to school, but she’s still fearful her former pimp will find her.

Gov. Linda Lingle has until July 6 to sign the bill into law. Supporters of the measure vow to raise the issue again next legislative session if the governor vetoes the bill.

source: http://www.kitv.com/news/23715987/detail.html

Campaign to end human trafficking

Mayor Mike Bloomberg launched a campaign last week against human trafficking, with posters and a new website to educate the public about modern-day slavery.
   “This new public education campaign will play a critical role in raising awareness of the impact of this horrible crime, encouraging New Yorkers to report it and most importantly letting victims know that help is available,” Bloomberg said. “Working together, let’s call an end to human trafficking.”

Human trafficking is described as the recruiting, transporting, selling or buying of people for the purpose of various forms of sexual or labor exploitation.
   The city will display posters in the five boroughs on bus shelters through June 13. A new anti-trafficking website can be found at nyc.gov to provide more information.
   Deputy Mayor Carol Robles-Roman said human trafficking is one of the fastest growing criminal enterprises in the world, but that the average person doesn’t know how to recognize this form of servitude.
   Although human trafficking can be difficult to recognize because it is often kept out of sight, some examples are prostitutes, domestic workers, factory workers, landscapers, restaurant workers and those working in nail salons or janitorial jobs. Victims can be American-born or immigrants.
   The city says if you are a victim or want to report criminal activity, call 911. For information or to help, call 311.
   Bill Livermore, executive director of the Somaly Mam Foundation and a member of the city Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force, said the practice is a multi-billion-dollar criminal enterprise nationwide, involving men, women and children. “Public education is part of a comprehensive strategy to eradicate human trafficking,” Livermore said.
   His nonprofit group is committed to ending slavery in North America and around the world.
   Karen Siegel, a psychologist, presented a stunning display of statistics on sexual exploitation of women during a forum on sex trafficking sponsored by the Center for the Women of New York at Borough Hall in March. “Labor and sex trafficking are the second largest and fastest growing crime in the world,” Siegel said. “It soon will top drug trafficking.”
   The mayor’s office utilized research available on its website from the Human Trafficking Resource Center, a nonprofit organization in Washington, DC, which operates a 24-hour hotline and disseminates information to the public. The hot-line averages 800 calls a month. “Awareness is increasing and more people are reporting sex trafficking,” said Andrea Austin, a spokeswoman for the group.
   The U.S. Department of State estimates 600,000 to 800,000 victims annually are trafficked across borders worldwide. Many taken to the United States do not speak English and are unable to communicate with people who could help them.
   According to the Human Trafficking Resource Center, traffickers use force, fraud and coercion to control the victims. Force can involve rape, beatings and confinement. Fraud involves false advertising for jobs in other countries that turn out to be prostitution, and coercion involves threats to people or their loved ones, taking their passports and making them become in debt to the traffickers.
   In Queens, Asian women are especially lured here with the promise of a job or a better way of life. Instead, they end up enslaved, owing their traffickers money, without documentation and kept as prostitutes in brothels, illegal massage parlors or on the street.
   Human rights groups in Queens applauded the mayor’s campaign, saying that human trafficking has gone on for too long.
   Susan Jung, founder of River in the Desert Advocacy Center in Flushing, said the initiative is a good beginning. “The public must be made aware of it,” Jung said. “It’s been going on for years, but is just now getting publicized.”
   Her group was organized in 2002 and fights domestic violence as well as human trafficking. Jeng noted that many of the traffickers are the victims’ husbands or mothers. “We call them snake heads in Chinese,” she said, “because they are so awful.”
   Jung wants to build a safe haven for victims in Flushing. “Walking down the street in Flushing, you never know who is affected by human trafficking,” she added.
   Ann Jawin, founder and chairwoman of the Center for the Women of New York, was elated about the mayor’s campaign. “That’s wonderful,” Jawin said. “It comes at a good time.”
   Since February, Jawin’s group has been waging its own battle against sex trafficking by asking Queens newspaper owners to pledge not to accept ads for services that are clearly a front for prostitution.
   So far, only Queens Chronicle Publisher Mark Weidler has signed, earning him a Good Guys award from the CWNY on Saturday. He says the Chronicle does not run such ads and will not in the future.
   Jawin is continuing to reach out to other Queens papers and if they don’t respond positively, she has vowed to get businesses and libraries to stop distributing them.

source:http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=20432189&BRD=2731&PAG=461&dept_id=574902&rfi=8

Walk With Me

Human Trafficking EDUCATOR, TRAINER, VICTIM CRISIS COUNSELLOR

WALK WITH ME can provide your organization with the tools necessary to effectively identify victims of human trafficking and provide those victims with the services necessary to overcome this horrendous cycle of abuse. As a human trafficking survivor, Timea E. Nagy can provide education and training from a perspective that is more effective than any other.

WHAT WE OFFER

TRAINING:

How to identify Human Trafficking victims.

Understanding the mindset of a Human Trafficking victim.

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24/7 VICTIM SERVICES

Mobile Crisis Counseling

Immediate Safe Housing

Ongoing Case Management

Clothing/Transportation

and more…

Together we can stop the cycle of abuse

For further information and for immediate crisis

counselling services  contact us at : Time.n@walk-with-me.org

Timea E. Nagy has provided training and worked with many agencies including the following:

RCMP, OPP, York Region Police Vice and Drug Units,Toronto Police Toronto, Vancouver, & York Region Victim Services.Salvation Army BC and Toronto, FBI Kansas City, Kansas, Vancouver Police Dept, Drug, Vice, and Sex Crimes Units, Edmonton Vice Unit,International Counsel of Women Refugees,Canadian Border Services

source: http://project417.com/walk_with_me

DEMI MOORE STEPS UP SEX TRAFFICKING CAMPAIGN

DEMI MOORE has stepped up her campaign against child sex trafficking – the actress met with lawmakers at the White House to discuss the issue on Tuesday (04May10).
The Ghost star launched The Demi and Ashton (DNA) Foundation with her husband Ashton Kutcher to raise awareness of the harrowing subject and to help survivors of abuse.
Now Moore has furthered her fight against sexual exploitation – she held a news conference at Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday afternoon (04May10) calling for harsh punishments for offenders, as well as more leniency and support for youngsters coerced into prostitution.
Speaking during the panel meeting, Moore said, “I think many Americans are more willing to accept that girls are being trafficked in Cambodia and can’t imagine it’s happening right here… It’s more profitable and less risky to sell a girl than drugs. Demand for prostitution fuels sex trafficking. And I think clearly our system isn’t working.”
Following her talk at Capitol Hill, Moore then visited the White House, along with three female sex abuse victims, to discuss human trafficking with White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett.
In a post on her Twitter.com page following the meetings, Moore writes, “Appreciated the opportunity to participate today in a Congressional briefing to end Child Sex Slavery in America!” (KD/WNWCWP&WNTWT/ZN)

source: http://thebosh.com/archives/2010/05/demi_moore_steps_up_sex_trafficking_campaign.php

Fatal promises:A real life look at human trafficking

Fatal Promises tells the stories of several people who were victims of human trafficking; from a young woman forced to become a stripper in the U.S. to Ukrainian men made to work in deadly conditions on an illegal fishing ship off the Russian coast.

“Most of the survivors were so much younger than I was and they had gone through so much. How you survive that and go on living and try to build a life is beyond me,” said Rohrer.

Deirdre Turner, a seniors honors program member at the college was instrumental in bringing the movie to campus through her role as research director of History Starts Now, a non-profit organization aiding in the fight against sex trafficking of minors in the United States.

“It is important that people in the United States become aware of this crime within their own country and not just internationally,” said Turner. “I hope to create a sense of awareness and raise consciousness of this crime and the possibilities available to fight human trafficking through involvement in organizations such as History Starts Now.”

Fatal Promises tells the story of the estimated 800,000 human beings who are trafficked across international borders every year. It is a multibillion-dollar global criminal enterprise, third in size after drugs and arms smuggling. Through personal stories by victims of trafficking, and interviews with politicians, non -governmental organizations (NGO’s) representatives and activists, Fatal Promises provides an in depth look at the realities of human trafficking suffered by victims and struggled against by NGO’s and activists versus the rhetoric of politicians and pundits who claim to be making significant strides into combating this horrific crime against humanity.

In addition to seeing clips from the film, students also heard from Sister Colleen Colbert, In addition to seeing clips from the film, students also heard from Sister Colleen Colbert, the assistant director of the St. Francis College campus ministry, who spoke about how her Sisters housed two victims of human trafficking.

source: http://www.caribbeanlifenews.com/articles/2010/04/12/news/ny_local/caribbeanlife-cl_news_international-2010_04_08_sub_fatal_promises.txt

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Oakland taking steps to fight sex trafficking

Oakland officials and community leaders are taking steps to fight sex trafficking in the city.

Members of the Victory Outreach Church of Oakland gathered Friday night in front of Oakland City Hall to increase awareness of sex trafficking and child exploitation in Oakland.

Volunteers from the church take to the streets on weekly basis to try to reach women and girls working as prostitutes. On any given night they meet more than a dozen teens and young women working as prostitutes, according to church members.

“We’re just letting them know there’s a destiny for their life,” said Sylvia Vigil, wife of the church’s pastor. “Basically they’re all victims,” she said.

The gathering took place after an Oakland man was convicted earlier in the day of kidnapping two teenage prostitutes and making them work for him.

Prosecutors said Vincent Turner was facing the possibility of life in prison after being convicted of kidnapping, human trafficking and rape Friday.

“To have a jury come back today with that verdict … shows that we have turned a corner,” Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O’Malley said Friday outside City Hall.

Turner’s case is one of the 140 that have been prosecuted in Alameda County since mid-2006, according to O’Malley. Of those, 110 resulted in felony convictions. All involved minors and multiple victims.

Turner, 31, is due to be sentenced June 25.

source: http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_14819168