Raising awareness for human trafficking

The Marquette Branch of the American Association of University of Women hosted a meeting to raise awareness about human trafficking Thursday night.

There have been reports of human trafficking in the Upper Peninsula, including Ironwood.  One of the reason the U.P. has seen reports is because it’s so isolated.

Michigan as a whole is one of the top five states in the country where trafficking is exploding.  Michigan borders Canada and has a large tourism industry, two factors that increase the abundance of human trafficking.

“Human trafficking is a form of modern day slavery,” Sexual Assault Advocate at the Women’s Center Kelly Laakso said.  “We tell people that slavery never really ended with the Emancipation Proclamation, it really just transformed itself moving on into today.”

“Human trafficking is basically someone–a trafficker–exploiting somebody else–the victim– for some sort of service or some sort of benefit.  Whether that’s labor trafficking or as popular culture would have popularized it, sex trafficking,” Youth Advocate for Harbor House Amy Kordus said.

One of the first steps to prevent human trafficking is to learn to identify the victim.

“Looking for (for example) if someone doesn’t have access to their identification, if they don’t have possessions that are in their control, if they’re accompanied by somebody who insists on telling a story all the time, if they’re telling you a story all the time that they’re a student or that they’re here on a visa or a tourist and there’s a lot of inconsistencies in their stories,” Kordus said.

“If you’re falling under the myths and misconceptions that it’s not here, then we don’t know to look for the victims of trafficking,” Laakso said.  “And really, stopping human trafficking starts with victim identification.”

“A lot times, these crimes are happening behind more obvious crimes you might think about,” Kordus said.  “If there’s a situation with zone ordinance or kidnapping or all sorts of criminal charges that people are more familiar with, there could be elements of human trafficking.”

“If there’s more of an awareness in the community we can push behind and look behind those crimes to look and see what’s happening.”

Kordus and Laakso say if people see anything suspicious or think they see a victim of human trafficking, people should call their local law enforcement agency.

For more information on human trafficking awareness, visit the Women’s Center website, or the Office of the Administration for Children & Families website.

http://youtube/R8dAx0mfiqs

 

source: http://abc10up.com/raising-awareness-human-trafficking/

The Marquette Branch of the American Association of University of Women hosted a meeting to raise awareness about human trafficking Thursday night.

There have been reports of human trafficking in the Upper Peninsula, including Ironwood.  One of the reason the U.P. has seen reports is because it’s so isolated.

Michigan as a whole is one of the top five states in the country where trafficking is exploding.  Michigan borders Canada and has a large tourism industry, two factors that increase the abundance of human trafficking.

“Human trafficking is a form of modern day slavery,” Sexual Assault Advocate at the Women’s Center Kelly Laakso said.  “We tell people that slavery never really ended with the Emancipation Proclamation, it really just transformed itself moving on into today.”

“Human trafficking is basically someone–a trafficker–exploiting somebody else–the victim– for some sort of service or some sort of benefit.  Whether that’s labor trafficking or as popular culture would have popularized it, sex trafficking,” Youth Advocate for Harbor House Amy Kordus said.

One of the first steps to prevent human trafficking is to learn to identify the victim.

“Looking for (for example) if someone doesn’t have access to their identification, if they don’t have possessions that are in their control, if they’re accompanied by somebody who insists on telling a story all the time, if they’re telling you a story all the time that they’re a student or that they’re here on a visa or a tourist and there’s a lot of inconsistencies in their stories,” Kordus said.

“If you’re falling under the myths and misconceptions that it’s not here, then we don’t know to look for the victims of trafficking,” Laakso said.  “And really, stopping human trafficking starts with victim identification.”

“A lot times, these crimes are happening behind more obvious crimes you might think about,” Kordus said.  “If there’s a situation with zone ordinance or kidnapping or all sorts of criminal charges that people are more familiar with, there could be elements of human trafficking.”

“If there’s more of an awareness in the community we can push behind and look behind those crimes to look and see what’s happening.”

Kordus and Laakso say if people see anything suspicious or think they see a victim of human trafficking, people should call their local law enforcement agency.

For more information on human trafficking awareness, visit the Women’s Center website, or the Office of the Administration for Children & Families website

Lake County commissioners expressed support for a local task force fighting human trafficking in the area at Tuesday’s county board meeting.

The task force was started to raise awareness of human and sex trafficking in the area, and its members approached Commissioner Brad Jones to ask if the county would be willing to commit funds toward a billboard. The advertisement would aim to raise awareness of trafficking and point victims toward helpful resources, Jones said.

“These things have happened in our area. It’s frightening. I think it behooves us to do what we can to help these organizations out,” Commissioner Rich Sve said.

Sve said they would ask a representative from the task force to come to a future board meeting to explain the billboard and its purpose in more depth.

Two Harbors Public Library director Michele Monson appeared before the board to ask for support for more library renovations. Recently, with county support, carpet was replaced in the building and Monson said she hoped the board would help with a project to install a new heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system. She said the current system is outdated.

“It looks like something out of a 1950s movie,” Monson said.

Jones said the outdated system has been a nagging problem, as parts become impossible to find and repairs become more difficult to make.

“It has been an ongoing struggle for several years,” he said.

The board agreed they would consider the requests in upcoming budget talks.

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– See more at: http://www.twoharborsmn.com/event/article/id/25542/#sthash.SfKBK711.dpuf

Lake County commissioners expressed support for a local task force fighting human trafficking in the area at Tuesday’s county board meeting.

The task force was started to raise awareness of human and sex trafficking in the area, and its members approached Commissioner Brad Jones to ask if the county would be willing to commit funds toward a billboard. The advertisement would aim to raise awareness of trafficking and point victims toward helpful resources, Jones said.

“These things have happened in our area. It’s frightening. I think it behooves us to do what we can to help these organizations out,” Commissioner Rich Sve said.

Sve said they would ask a representative from the task force to come to a future board meeting to explain the billboard and its purpose in more depth.

Two Harbors Public Library director Michele Monson appeared before the board to ask for support for more library renovations. Recently, with county support, carpet was replaced in the building and Monson said she hoped the board would help with a project to install a new heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system. She said the current system is outdated.

“It looks like something out of a 1950s movie,” Monson said.

Jones said the outdated system has been a nagging problem, as parts become impossible to find and repairs become more difficult to make.

“It has been an ongoing struggle for several years,” he said.

The board agreed they would consider the requests in upcoming budget talks.

Tags:

– See more at: http://www.twoharborsmn.com/event/article/id/25542/#sthash.SfKBK711.dpuf

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Oceanside couple arrested for sex trafficking a child

Girl grew up and came back to seek justice

A Mexican girl sent to America for a better life never saw the inside of a classroom. Instead, she became a human-trafficking victim in Oceanside.

For nearly two years, the 12-year-old was raped repeatedly, beaten, sold for sex and forced to work for no pay by a couple related to her, law-enforcement sources said.

The alleged traffickers, a husband and wife, were arrested Thursday on Brooks Street near Maxson Street by the North County Human Trafficking Task Force. That coalition includes the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department, Oceanside police and Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations team.

Inez Martinez Garcia, 43, and her husband, Marcial Garcia Hernandez, 45, were booked on 13 felony counts of aggravated sexual assault of a child under age 14, the sheriff’s department. Both immigrated from Mexico and are legal permanent residents of the United States.

“There have been some real bad cases, but this is one of the worst cases we’ve had,” said Sgt. Joe Mata of the sheriff’s department. “This was so important because there are so many victims and nothing gets done.”

The victim, now an adult, came forward two and a half years ago with details of the abuses she suffered after she was smuggled into the country. Her name and current age have not been released because of the sexual nature of the crime and authorities’ ongoing investigation.

Once at the Hernandez home, she was forced to care for the couple’s three young children, cook and clean, said sheriff’s deputy George Crysler, the case investigator. She was also forced to have sex with Hernandez and occasionally sold as a sex slave, he said.

In addition, the suspects allegedly made the girl lie about her age to get a job at a restaurant and then kept her wages.

The victim was beaten whenever she refused to participate in sex or did not complete her work to her traffickers’ satisfaction, said Crysler, who added that she was “under the constant threat of physical abuse.”

The captivity lasted 21 months before the girl was beaten so severely that someone reported the situation to authorities. Child Protective Services removed the victim from the home and eventually returned her to her family in Mexico, Mata said.

At the time of the trafficking, the child did not have permission to be in the United States. She has legal status today, according to the sheriff’s department.

In the past decade, law-enforcement agencies and nongovernmental groups across the country have focused on human trafficking and strived to increase awareness of the crime. Human trafficking — labor and sex — rivals drug trafficking as the second most profitable criminal enterprise behind the arms trade.

National and international leaders have also been paying more attention to the crime, which they said has ensnared tens of millions of people. A study released this week by a San Diego State University researcher estimated that 31 percent of unauthorized immigrants who were surveyed had experienced labor trafficking, often including sexual abuse.

Experts said foreigners are often lured to the U.S. with promises of a better life, but find themselves sold for sex or working in terrible conditions with little to no pay. Confinement can be physical as well as psychological.

Trafficking victims can also be U.S. citizens — including those enslaved by gangs, which have become involved in sex trafficking in recent years, said Don Stump, executive director of North County Lifeline. His organization provides counseling and mental-health services to victims of trafficking and child abuse, among other clients.

Lifeline is helping the victim in the Oceanside case, but Stump said he could not give specifics to protect the victim and maintain her privacy.

“She has been a very cooperative and forthright client in working with law enforcement because she wants to see some justice,” said Stump, whose organization hosted a daylong conference about trafficking on Friday in Oceanside. “The biggest challenge right now with human trafficking is making sure the services are in place for the victims, but also making sure the community is aware of the specifics of trafficking right in their own neighborhoods.”

Mata of the sheriff’s department said when the young woman returned to the U.S., she was encouraged to come forward by someone close to her. She had begun to experience flashbacks and showed symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder.

She sought help from the Bilateral Safety Corridor Coalition, which works with trafficking victims. The group, based in National City, helped reopen her juvenile case and notify authorities about the abuse she had suffered as a child.

Marisa Ugarte, director of the coalition, said her organization maintains victims’ confidentiality. She did say the survivor in this case is no longer a client.

“There are many, many cases like this one,” Ugarte said. “The most important part now is that she is here and she is going to get justice.”

One challenge for groups that help trafficking victims is that unauthorized immigrants, including children, are often returned to their native country even though they may qualify for legal status as a victim of trafficking or other crimes. In such situations, including the Oceanside case, the alleged abusers are not prosecuted.

Hernandez and Garcia are in jail and will be arraigned early next week. A spokeswoman for the District Attorney’s office said it is too soon to comment on the case.

 

source:http://www.nctimes.com/blogsnew/news/immigration/oceanside-couple-arrested-for-sex-trafficking-a-child

 

How to End Sex Trafficking in Massage Parlors in Your Community

This is part two of an interview with Jessica Goodman, a student activist at
Carnegie Mellon University who is doing research on anti-trafficking issues and
helping rally support for a proposal that would help end sex trafficking in Pittsburgh
massage parlors. Here, Goodman outlines how you can get a similar ordinance
passed in your own community. To read part one, click
here
.

1) Investigate. Read through the johns’ boards; see how many
massage parlors are in your area. Making a map helps; ours was color-coded by
city council district to make it easy for people to see how close these places
are to our homes and schools. Be warned: these boards can be extremely graphic
and disturbing.

2) Identify. Look for the best person or office to introduce
the ordinance. Perhaps your county has more investigative powers than your city;
maybe your state house is the best place to look. Ending human trafficking is a
non-partisan issue, so feel free to look for supporters from outside of your own
experience. We have received wonderful support from the religious community in
Pittsburgh, including Sister Jeanette Bussen, a local nun and anti-trafficking
activist who I would never have met without this work.

3) Instigate. Start drumming up community support. Ask to
talk for 15 minutes at the ends of college clubs’ meetings, present to church
groups and contact local fraternal organizations. Ask local massage therapists
if they know where illegitimate establishments are located; because johns
sometimes confuse good businesses with places to buy sex, some massage
therapists have been sexually harassed by them. These places are deeply embedded
in our communities — in Pittsburgh, not one of the 15 brothels posing as
massage parlors is more than a few blocks from a church, synagogue or mosque. It
is an issue on everyone’s plate, whether we know it or not.

Once you have the knowledge, the institutional and the community support, you
may need to address the concerns of local business owners, consult law
enforcemen and make sure that your case is as solid as possible. And ask for
help — the Project to End Human Trafficking and I are committed to getting this
passed in Pittsburgh and elsewhere. If you live in Pittsburgh, please consider
volunteering for or donating to the Project to End Human Trafficking
or handwriting a letter of support to Mayor Ravenstahl.

I am a bit of a policy wonk, so my first reaction to a new issue is to do
research. For me, reading through all of the materials put out by the National
Human Trafficking Resource Center, calling the National Human Trafficking
Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 for information on anti-trafficking organizations in
my area and reading the U.S. State Department’s Trafficking in Persons report
gave me enough of a foundation to form an opinion about how to best combat
trafficking in Pittsburgh.

If you are better with counseling than I am, volunteer to work with
survivors. It can be satisfying work, if not always fun. If you only have a
little time, consider writing a paper on trafficking. I bet you $10 donated to
your favorite anti-trafficking organization, I can take any term-paper topic and
find a way to make it about ending trafficking. Seriously. Email me.

The most important thing any student can do is to learn the signs of human
trafficking. Confinement, abuse, debt-bondage, threats, minors in commercial
sex, adults in jobs they can’t leave — these are things anyone can see anytime
and report to the National Human Trafficking Hotline (1-888-373-7888). The call
specialists keep track of all of the tips they receive and pass them on to law
enforcement. Together, we can end sex trafficking in our communities.

source: http://news.change.org/humantrafficking.rss

Victory! LAPD Releases Detained Trafficking Victims

Last November, a police raid on a Los Angeles club resulted in the arrest and detainment of 80 undocumented women. But instead of listening to their claims of abuse and spotting the many, significant indicators of human trafficking, the LAPD treated the women like criminals and turned them over to ICE. Now, finally, all the women have been released from custody. But the club’s owners and operators and the men who bought and used these trafficked women are still free.

This victory was won by the Coalition for Humane Immigration Rights in Los Angeles and the American Immigration Lawyers Association, both of whom worked to get the detained women released, and in some cases, interviewed as possible human trafficking victims. Additionally, over 1,000 Change.org members signed a petition demanding that the LAPD stop treating potential trafficking victims like criminals. Thanks to the advocacy of so many, this case has a happy ending. But across the country, trafficked men and women — especially undocumented victims — are treated as criminals and deported before they get a chance to tell their stories.

The remaining failure in the Club 907 case is that the police didn’t arrest any of the people responsible for trafficking, abusing, or taking advantage of these women. Sadly, the double injustice of arresting trafficking victims while their traffickers and buyers go free is not unusual news. In this case, the injustice of arresting victims has been corrected. But as Lauren Markham writes over on the Immigrant Rights blog, the club owners were advertising for more dancers on Craigslist within a week.

The process of reforming police departments to identify potential trafficking victims and treat them as such will be a long one. That’s why the efforts from organizations like CHIR and AILA, as well as grassroots advocacy like Change.org members holding police accountable, are so critical to protect human trafficking victims. And maybe next time, this victory will be even more complete when the victims are treated as victims and their abusers are held accountable.

 

 

source: http://humantrafficking.change.org/blog/view/victory_lapd_releases_detained_trafficking_victims

 

Published in: on January 23, 2011 at 11:22 am  Leave a Comment  
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Human Remains Found Near Red Rock Canyon

LAS VEGAS — Hikers at the Red Rock Conservation Area on Thursday stumbled upon remains that turned out to be human. Now investigators are trying to figure who it was.

“It could be an injured hiker that was unable to find his or her way out of the area. It could have been a suicide. It could be remains from a homicide. That’s unknown and undetermined at this time,” said Metro Police Lt. Les Lane.

Metro says around 2:30p.m. Thursday, hikers found and reported what appeared to be parts of a human spine wrapped in a shirt. It is too early to tell whether the remains belong to a man or a woman or how old the person was. The bones were found near Black Velvet Canyon in the Red Rock Conservation Area.

Other hikers described the rough terrain near the canyon.

“The only trail that really goes back into the canyon is through a wash which has got a lot of big boulders, like house/vehicle-sized kind of stuff,” said hiker Bryan Hendrick. “At a certain point, it’s blocked and past that, you have probably a 30 foot cliff you have to climb past to continue going up.”

Metro’s Search and Rescue will head to the area Friday to recover the bones. Crime scene investigators will also scour the area looking for any possible evidence. Police say crews will need some time to positively identify the remains.

source: http://www.8newsnow.com/story/13488728/human-remains-found-near-red-rock-canyon?redirected=true

Tell Village Voice Media to Stop Child Sex Trafficking on Backpage.com

Child sex trafficking on Backpage.com, owned by Village Voice Media, is becoming a disturbing trend.

Earlier this week a Georgia man was arrested for pimping two 17-year-old girls around the Nashville area. Detectives responded to a suspicious ad on Backpage.com and drove to a motel. There, they found the teens and their 37-year-old pimp, as well as a laptop computer, likely used for the online advertising. Just four days prior to that, four people in Denver were arrested for forcing a teen girl into prostitution. They also advertised her sexual services, including semi-nude pictures, on Backpage. And last year, a South Dakota couple was arrested for selling underage girls for sex on …. wait for it … Backpage.com yet again.

Backpage’s terms of use, of course, prohibit advertising for illegal commercial sex acts or exploiting minors, but both are happening anyway in Nashville, Denver, and Sioux City. And like Craigslist, Backpage and their parent company Village Voice Media are doing little to prevent the sale of children or trafficked adults on their site. Village Voice Media has a duty to ensure that young girls aren’t being abused in the commercial sex industry with help from their website, and that they aren’t facilitating human trafficking.

humanPlease, ask Village Voice Media to stop child sex trafficking on Backpage.com.

source: http://humantrafficking.change.org/blog/view/demi_moore_sells_personal_toy_collection_to_end_child_sex_trafficking

Tell Village Voice Media to Stop Child Sex Trafficking on Backpage.com

Child sex trafficking on Backpage.com, owned by Village Voice Media, is becoming a disturbing trend.

Earlier this week a Georgia man was arrested for pimping two 17-year-old girls around the Nashville area. Detectives responded to a suspicious ad on Backpage.com and drove to a motel. There, they found the teens and their 37-year-old pimp, as well as a laptop computer, likely used for the online advertising. Just four days prior to that, four people in Denver were arrested for forcing a teen girl into prostitution. They also advertised her sexual services, including semi-nude pictures, on Backpage. And last year, a South Dakota couple was arrested for selling underage girls for sex on …. wait for it … Backpage.com yet again.

Backpage’s terms of use, of course, prohibit advertising for illegal commercial sex acts or exploiting minors, but both are happening anyway in Nashville, Denver, and Sioux City. And like Craigslist, Backpage and their parent company Village Voice Media are doing little to prevent the sale of children or trafficked adults on their site. Village Voice Media has a duty to ensure that young girls aren’t being abused in the commercial sex industry with help from their website, and that they aren’t facilitating human trafficking.

Please, ask Village Voice Media to stop child sex trafficking on Backpage.com.

source: http://humantrafficking.change.org/petitions/view/tell_village_voice_media_to_stop_child_sex_trafficking_on_backpagecomsource:

Published in: on September 14, 2010 at 8:28 pm  Comments (1)  
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Take Action to End Slavery in Corporate Supply Chains

Millions of men, women, and children are enslaved around the world, producing the raw materials that create products we use every day. Slaves pick the cotton that ends up in our t-shirts, mine the tungsten that makes our laptops run, and harvest the cocoa we find so delicious. But two pieces of pending legislation in California could help end the use of slavery in major corporations’ supply chains. Will you help make them law?

The proposed legislation would be California state law, but if it passes, the effects will be felt all over the country and all over the world by reducing the market for slave-made goods. The California Supply Chain Transparency Act of 2010 (SB 657) would require retailers and manufacturers doing business in California and having more than $100 million in annual worldwide gross receipts to publicly disclose some basic things about what they’re doing to end slavery in their supply chains. That includes whether or not the company uses verification to evaluate and address human trafficking risks in product supply chains including if they used 3rd party verification, conducts audits of suppliers and whether audits are independent and unannounced, direct supplier certification and what they do to train and maintain internal accountability for employees and contractors failing to meet company standards on slavery and trafficking.With this information, consumers across the country will have better tools to help them make ethical decisions about what they purchase.

Because California is such a large economy, this new law would affect major corporations all over the world, including those who produce some of the biggest supply chain slavery offenders, like consumer electronics, clothing, and food products. Of course, that means the big business interests who would be affected are fighting hard to keep the law from actually requiring them to simply tell us what they do, if anything, to keep slavery out of the products they sell us. Right now, they’re hiding behind the skirts of big business association like California Manufacturers and Technology Association and a mountain of cash, but they are fighting. And that’s why we need you, wherever you live, to let California know the world is watching their decision.

Published in: on September 1, 2010 at 6:33 am  Comments (2)  
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I have an answer to your question: HOW BAD IS SEX TRAFFICKING IN LAS VEGAS?

My name is Glendene Grant and I have an answer to your question: HOW BAD IS SEX TRAFFICKING IN LAS VEGAS?

In a word: RAMPANT!
In a few words: It is out of control!
Remember: WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS STAYS IN VEGAS!

My daughter is JESSIE FOSTER. Jessie is an international endangered missing woman and the victim of human trafficking. Jessie is from Kamloops, BC Canada and she went missing from her home in North Las Vegas, NV USA on March 29, 2006.

When Jessie first went missing, the officer in charge of the case, Det. Molnar told me that Jessie probably decided to leave on her own and has started a new life somewhere else. He said that he found a missing woman one time and she told him to tell her mother she did not want to see her again – to which I told him then he would have to get her to tell me to my face, because Jessie would NEVER do that.

Then he said, “besides . . . you know, it is a big desert out there, and she will probably be found one day”.

With nothing to suggest my daughter would leave her family in turmoil and choose to leave her life behind and start a new one OR that Jessie was dead, this is what he told me.

Then he had the nerve to tell me that the media would never be interested in Jessie’s case because there is nothing sensational about it. I LOOKED AT HIM, AND TOOK IT AS A DARE . . . how DARE he say that to the mother of a missing child, and – to me, he DARED me to get media attention. Det. Molnar obviously has no clue what it is like to be a mother bear, I DO . . . I am one!

Jessie went missing on March 29, 2006, the North Las Vegas refused to take a missing person’s report until April 9, 2006 and within two weeks, I was getting media attention for Jessie:
– On April 24, 2006 the Geraldo at Large producer was at my home in Canada filming a segment on Jessie’s disappearance.
– On the October 11, 2006 episode of the Maury Povich Show did a missing person’s episode and showed Jessie’s missing information.
– On April 26, 2007 I was on the Montel Williams Show, the topic was human trafficking. This show was aired several times. Plus a new update to Jessie’s case on July 8, 2008.
– In August 2007 Jessie’s story had a full page article in the National Enquirer.
– In August 2007 Jessie’s story came out in a book called MISSING! The Disappeared, Lost and Abducted in Canada – by Lisa Wojna.
– In August 2008 Jessie’s case was aired on America’s Most Wanted. There is a page on their website dedicated to Jessie. There was a new update to Jessie’s case on December 19, 2009.
– In August 2009 Jessie’s case was 1 of 15 that was featured on E! Entertainment’s documentary, Young Beautiful and Vanished.
– On February 14, 2010 I was invited to be a guest speaker at the 19th Annual Women’s Memorial March in Vancouver, BC.
– On March 29, 2010 Jessie’s case was featured on CTV’s Canada AM about Jessie being missing 4 years that day. I was on with Diana Trepkov, Canada’s Leading Forensic Artist who had just completed a series of age enhancement drawings of Jessie. One showed her as a she would look, as human trafficking victim for 4 years.
– In April 2010 there was an award named after Jessie, called the Glendene & Jessie Foster Award that was given to many people who are working to help end human trafficking (Canadian MP Joy Smith; Chief of York Ontario, Canada Police, Armand LaBarge; Canada’s leading human trafficking expert and author, Professor Benjamin Perrin; and many, many more).
– In September 2010 Professor Benjamin Perrin’s book, Invisible Chains: Canada’s Underground World of Human Trafficking is being released, Jessie’s case is included in this book.
– THERE IS SO MUCH MORE . . . BUT I THINK YOU GET MY POINT – AND I THINK DETECTIVE MOLNAR GOT ME!!

Human trafficking is the number 3 illegal money making activity in the world. The top 3 are: DRUGS, GUNS & HUMAN TRAFFICKING (or HUMAN TRADE, also known as PEOPLE . . . as our loved ones).
However:
DRUGS can be sold only & used once
GUNS can be sold & used many times
PEOPLE can be (and are) sold & used over and over and over again.

So I plan on starting an organization called M.A.T.H. (Mother’s Against Trafficking Humans). (I don’t know what to do, all I know is I WILL do it.)

Do the M.A.T.H.!
2.5 million people are trafficked yearly around the world*
PLUS a global annual market of about $42.5 billion**
EQUALS who is getting rich? Someone is, and it is not the victims and their families.
*The United Nations estimates 2.5 million people from 127 different countries are being trafficked around the world annually.
**The Council of Europe states there is a global annual market of about $42.5 billion.

So, even though Human Trafficking runs RAMPANT in Las Vegas, I am doing every single thing I can to prevent it.

If I am able to prevent just one person from becoming a human trafficking victim, then I will be able to live the rest of my life in relative peace, with or without getting my Jessie back or ever finding answers to what happened to her.

If I am able to prevent another member of my family from going through this hell, then my job as Jessie’s mother would not have been in vain. Jessie would not have gone missing in vain.

Sincerely, not just Jessie’s mom, but also Crystal, Katie & Jennee’s mom and JJ, ML & IJ’s grandma, Glendene Grant.

source: http://jessiesmomglendene.newsvine.com/_news/2010/08/30/4998402-i-have-an-answer-to-your-question-how-bad-is-sex-trafficking-in-las-vegas

When Victims Become Traffickers

Burmese police announced this week that out of the hundreds of human traffickers they have arrested over the past several years, at least 100 of them were once victims. Sadly, trafficking victims becoming traffickers is not unusual. But what makes a person go from victim to trafficker?

Most of the 100 victims-turned-traffickers were trafficked from Burma into China and Thailand for forced labor, forced prostitution, or forced marriage. Once discovered, they were shipped back to Burma, sometimes deported, and usually with no compensation. Back in Burma, there were no support services for them, no money for counseling or job training, no help with medical bills or education. The lack of support for victims traps them in a vicious cycle. Some people end up trafficked again and again because they cannot break out of that cycle. Others eventually break the cycle, by becoming traffickers themselves.

Victims can turn into traffickers for a number of reasons. For those trafficked as children, there may be no other conceivable industry for them to enter other than the one they were sold into as a child, whether that’s commercial sex, brick making, or domestic service. So as an adult, they follow the only career path they’ve known and recruit other children into the same industry. Others many find that the only model of power in their life is the person who owns and controls them — their trafficker. When they look around for ways to empower themselves, becoming a subjugater of others is all they see. Still others, as is the case with many of the 100 Burmese nationals, may not even realize what they’re engaging in is against the law. They know the trafficking routes, brokers, and bosses from the time they were forced to work. That they should recruit others to do the same thing might feel like the natural extension of their previous “job.”

(more…)

Published in: on August 28, 2010 at 10:29 pm  Comments (1)  
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