Human Remains Found Near Red Rock Canyon

LAS VEGAS — Hikers at the Red Rock Conservation Area on Thursday stumbled upon remains that turned out to be human. Now investigators are trying to figure who it was.

“It could be an injured hiker that was unable to find his or her way out of the area. It could have been a suicide. It could be remains from a homicide. That’s unknown and undetermined at this time,” said Metro Police Lt. Les Lane.

Metro says around 2:30p.m. Thursday, hikers found and reported what appeared to be parts of a human spine wrapped in a shirt. It is too early to tell whether the remains belong to a man or a woman or how old the person was. The bones were found near Black Velvet Canyon in the Red Rock Conservation Area.

Other hikers described the rough terrain near the canyon.

“The only trail that really goes back into the canyon is through a wash which has got a lot of big boulders, like house/vehicle-sized kind of stuff,” said hiker Bryan Hendrick. “At a certain point, it’s blocked and past that, you have probably a 30 foot cliff you have to climb past to continue going up.”

Metro’s Search and Rescue will head to the area Friday to recover the bones. Crime scene investigators will also scour the area looking for any possible evidence. Police say crews will need some time to positively identify the remains.

source: http://www.8newsnow.com/story/13488728/human-remains-found-near-red-rock-canyon?redirected=true

Sarah Jessica Parker and Gabourey Sidibe Fight Sex Trafficking in Brooklyn

Sex trafficking has no place in the city, according to a new campaign by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office, and both Sarah Jessica Parker and Gabourey Sidibe agree. To help promote the campaign and a new local hot line, the celebs recently lent their voices to a set of ads currently running on local airwaves.

In SJP’s spot, the Sex and the City star notes that she had been unaware of sex trafficking as a domestic crime. But, she states, “At least 100,000 American children are trafficked into prostitution each year.” Gabourey Sidibe’s PSA complements with a more local approach; the Precious star was born in Brooklyn and is all too aware of the crime’s prevalence. “It makes me sick,” she says, “to think of those animals taking 12-, 13- and 14-year-old girls and renting them out to a John.”

Listeners are encouraged to be aware of sex trafficking in Brooklyn, to know that its victims include both immigrants and Americans, runaways and otherwise vulnerable girls and boys. The campaign also includes posters and fliers visible throughout the community, with information on how to identify sex trafficking. And those with tips to share – or those in need of services – can call the Brooklyn Sex Trafficking Unit’s new hot line at (718) 250-2770.

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Five Arrested for Webcasting Sexual Torture of Mentally Disabled Woman

Five men were indicted in Missouri for sexually torturing a young, mentally-disabled women on live Internet webcast, forcing her to dance at strip clubs, and other heinous abuses. While the details of this case are some of the most gruesome that have ever been revealed, it serves as a textbook example of several of the most common and critical components of sex trafficking cases. And some of the men involved are well-known community leaders.

Editor’s Note: The details of this case are especially disturbing, even for this blog.

Five years of unspeakable torture ended for one Missouri woman this week, when her abusers were arrested and charged with a nauseating smorgasbord of crimes. The victim, who is referred to as FV only, met Edward Bagley, the alleged primary abuser, when she was just 16. She had lived in foster care her whole life and suffered from mental disabilities, so he easily convinced her that he could help her become a model and a dancer. Instead, he forced her into a life of sexual slavery, rape, torture, humiliation, and abuse. Traffickers prey on the vulnerable, and that includes young people, people with disabilities, and people without strong support systems, like foster children. FV fit the profile too well.

Bagley allegedly made money off FV in a number of ways, many of which were online. He advertised for sexual torture sessions with her online and broadcast them on streaming webcasts. He forced her to dance at strip clubs around Missouri. He traded her to his friends for cigarettes and steaks (yes, steaks). Traffickers increasingly use the Internet to advertise and exploit victims, but some exploitation still takes place the old-fashioned way, in strip clubs and by men exchanging meat for meat.

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Take Action to End Slavery in Corporate Supply Chains

Millions of men, women, and children are enslaved around the world, producing the raw materials that create products we use every day. Slaves pick the cotton that ends up in our t-shirts, mine the tungsten that makes our laptops run, and harvest the cocoa we find so delicious. But two pieces of pending legislation in California could help end the use of slavery in major corporations’ supply chains. Will you help make them law?

The proposed legislation would be California state law, but if it passes, the effects will be felt all over the country and all over the world by reducing the market for slave-made goods. The California Supply Chain Transparency Act of 2010 (SB 657) would require retailers and manufacturers doing business in California and having more than $100 million in annual worldwide gross receipts to publicly disclose some basic things about what they’re doing to end slavery in their supply chains. That includes whether or not the company uses verification to evaluate and address human trafficking risks in product supply chains including if they used 3rd party verification, conducts audits of suppliers and whether audits are independent and unannounced, direct supplier certification and what they do to train and maintain internal accountability for employees and contractors failing to meet company standards on slavery and trafficking.With this information, consumers across the country will have better tools to help them make ethical decisions about what they purchase.

Because California is such a large economy, this new law would affect major corporations all over the world, including those who produce some of the biggest supply chain slavery offenders, like consumer electronics, clothing, and food products. Of course, that means the big business interests who would be affected are fighting hard to keep the law from actually requiring them to simply tell us what they do, if anything, to keep slavery out of the products they sell us. Right now, they’re hiding behind the skirts of big business association like California Manufacturers and Technology Association and a mountain of cash, but they are fighting. And that’s why we need you, wherever you live, to let California know the world is watching their decision.

Published in: on September 1, 2010 at 6:33 am  Comments (2)  
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Take Action to End Slavery in Corporate Supply Chains

Millions of men, women, and children are enslaved around the world, producing the raw materials that create products we use every day. Slaves pick the cotton that ends up in our t-shirts, mine the tungsten that makes our laptops run, and harvest the cocoa we find so delicious. But two pieces of pending legislation in California could help end the use of slavery in major corporations’ supply chains. Will you help make them law?

The proposed legislation would be California state law, but if it passes, the effects will be felt all over the country and all over the world by reducing the market for slave-made goods. The California Supply Chain Transparency Act of 2010 (SB 657) would require retailers and manufacturers doing business in California and having more than $100 million in annual worldwide gross receipts to publicly disclose some basic things about what they’re doing to end slavery in their supply chains. That includes whether or not the company uses verification to evaluate and address human trafficking risks in product supply chains including if they used 3rd party verification, conducts audits of suppliers and whether audits are independent and unannounced, direct supplier certification and what they do to train and maintain internal accountability for employees and contractors failing to meet company standards on slavery and trafficking.With this information, consumers across the country will have better tools to help them make ethical decisions about what they purchase.

Because California is such a large economy, this new law would affect major corporations all over the world, including those who produce some of the biggest supply chain slavery offenders, like consumer electronics, clothing, and food products. Of course, that means the big business interests who would be affected are fighting hard to keep the law from actually requiring them to simply tell us what they do, if anything, to keep slavery out of the products they sell us. Right now, they’re hiding behind the skirts of big business association like California Manufacturers and Technology Association and a mountain of cash, but they are fighting. And that’s why we need you, wherever you live, to let California know the world is watching their decision.

source:http://humantrafficking.change.org/blog/view/take_action_to_end_slavery_in_corporate_supply_chains

Rugby World Cup ‘magnet for sex traffickers’

Sex traffickers will be targeting next year’s Rugby World Cup as a business opportunity, a visiting anti-trafficking campaigner says.

 

Sex traffickers will be targeting next year’s Rugby World Cup as a business opportunity, a visiting anti-trafficking campaigner says.

New Zealander Judy Boyle, who heads a global trafficking awareness campaign, said traffickers operated wherever there was a demand for their business.

“You think traffickers aren’t smiling about the Rugby World Cup?”

Her concern is being taken seriously by the New Zealand police, which says the risk of trafficking for prostitution was multiplied during big gatherings of people.

Ms Boyle is now based in Athens but has been in Nelson giving a series of trafficking awareness workshops.

She said wherever there was an opportunity to make money, such as an international sporting event, traffickers would be seeing dollar signs.

The International Rugby Board’s head of the Rugby World Cup, Kit McConnell, told a conference in Christchurch this week that the event next year would boost New Zealand’s economy by $1 billion and attract 85,000 visitors.

Though there had not been any prosecutions brought in New Zealand for sex trafficking, Ms Boyle said it was difficult to put numbers on how many people were affected because it was an “invisible crime”.

An estimated 12.3 million adults and children were in forced labour and forced prostitution around the world, according to the annual United States State Department’s Trafficking in Persons report.

The report said it was possible trafficking victims were not being detected in New Zealand.

The country had been a destination for women from Hong Kong, Thailand, Taiwan, China, Malaysia and Eastern Europe trafficked into forced prostitution.

Superintendent Grant O’Fee, who is the commander of police operations for the Rugby World Cup, said his team was conscious of the potential for trafficking crime during the event. “We are aware opportunities exist in any big gatherings especially at an international event like the Rugby World Cup.”

He was constantly in touch with permanent fulltime Interpol staff stationed at police national headquarters regarding cross-border crime. “There are certain things we know are going to happen but that is not to say we don’t ignore the more under the radar sort of stuff.”

Mr O’Fee said a member of his team had met with ECPAT, an international organisation dedicated to ending the trafficking of children for sexual purposes, and the police specialist child exploitation team based in Auckland to make sure they were aware of the potential of the problem.

ECPAT’s New Zealand director, Alan Bell, said it was likely that the sex industry would experience an increase in trade during the Rugby World Cup.

The US report said no research had been conducted to determine the full extent of the trafficking problem in New Zealand.

As well, it did not have a comprehensive anti-trafficking law.

Ms Boyle, who has a Masters degree in education from Harvard, said she would like to see some thorough research done into the extent of the problem in New Zealand.

She began her work campaigning against trafficking 10 years ago when she read an article about a sex worker who had tried to hang herself with her own stockings.

She could not sleep for days.

“It was something I knew nothing about but once you know some things it is very difficult to unknow them.”

She began the No Project as an international awareness campaign to effect change in the next generation.

“This can only be achieved through a well-informed youth population who are encouraged to challenge the attitudes and behaviour of previous generations.”

Ms Boyle said she was disturbed by the invisibility of the industry and its silent endorsement.

“You know where all this goes on? In suburbia, it’s the nice suburban homes in every city around the planet.”

To find out more about the extent of human trafficking visit stopthetraffik.org or mtvexit.org.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING

2.5 million people are in forced labour, including sexual exploitation, at any given time as a result of trafficking.

Fifty-six per cent, or 1.4 million, are in Asia and the Pacific.

Most victims are between 18 and 24, while 95 per cent experience physical or sexual violence.

New Zealand is a destination country for human trafficking from Malaysia, Hong Kong, China and other Asian countries for sexual exploitation.

A multi-agency taskforce is developing a national plan of action to stop people trafficking in New Zealand.

Source: US Department of State Trafficking in Persons Report/Department of Labour

source:http://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/news/4012708/Rugby-World-Cup-magnet-for-sex-traffickers

Stopping the traffic

Portland works to fight human trafficking

Many people in Portland used to brag about the city’s high number of strip clubs and porn shops. Portlanders took pride in their city’s illicit businesses. However, the jokes are not quite as common anymore, as Portland has woken up to a serious tragedy that occurs here every day: human trafficking.

Recently it has come to Portland’s attention that human trafficking has become a huge problem here.

According to the United States Department of Justice, approximately 300,000 youths are trafficked for sexual exploitation. Every year Portland is ranked second in the United States for minor sex trafficking.

More and more facts like these are surfacing, making people realize that the problem is not just overseas, but occurring right in Portland’s own backyard. One of the reasons Portland is such a hot spot for human trafficking is because of its position along the I-5 corridor, as well as its many ports along the Willamette River.

Government officials, activists and others are taking steps to try and make a change, as well as help Portland’s reputation. They are trying to help both the victims and the offenders by trying to make a dent in the problem.

One step being taken to help aid victims is that the YWCA in Portland will use $900,000 in federal money to help create a shelter for victims of human sex trafficking.

Providing a shelter will create a safe space, which could help make victims feel like they have options other than just servitude. They will have a place to go, a place to escape the horrible pain of the life that they are living.

Steps are also being taken to ensure that perpetrators own up to their actions. Multnomah County leaders are trying to open up a “john school” by the end of the year.

The john school is a day-long voluntary class for first-time offenders who pick up adult prostitutes.

The first john school existed in San Francisco, and the plan for Portland is to create a similar one. Although Portland has had two other john schools in the past, according to The Portland Tribune, it seems like a john school could be the answer for Portland’s troubles today. This is an important step in helping stop the human trafficking epidemic in Portland.

Offenders will be referred to treatment when necessary. The plan is also to teach offenders about the impact their crimes have on the people involved as well as the people within the community instead of just sitting in a jail cell.

Once the convicted offender completes the john school, they will get the charge erased from their record after six months if they do not commit further offenses. The offender must pay $1,000 to participate in the class, a fee that will go to paying the courts, police and victim services.

Ideally, with the establishment of the john school, repeat offenses could be stopped if the perpetrators can actually learn from their actions. If they cannot learn, then further actions could be taken.

While important steps such as these are being taken toward preventing human trafficking, it is important to make note that more can still, and should be, done.

Oregon must take another important step toward human trafficking prevention, and that is to create stricter laws for offenders who solicit sex for the first time. As the law stands, a first-time offender would typically receive probation or community service.

What is the incentive for first-time offenders to fork over the $1,000 for the john school class? Other than getting the crime expunged off their record, there is not much if the laws stay the way they are. Stricter punishments need to be enforced.

The steps that Portland is taking are important in making a dent in human trafficking. Portland’s plans make sense and are good first steps, but more needs to be done and more people need to be involved.

source:http://www.dailyvanguard.com/stopping-the-traffic-1.2302455

Virginia as a source of human trafficking

For many Virginians apart from those living in Northern Virginia, sex trafficking victims have the faces of Asian girls in massage parlors or Eastern European ladies in strip clubs. To them, that the victim’s face can be one of many American children sexually exploited anywhere in the United States does not seem to enter in their mind. However, the past reports show that Virginia is nowhere near to be a safe haven for the minor trafficking victims in the United States. The domestic minor sex trafficking in fact may go unnoticed when general public as well as law enforcement authorities are unaware that American children can be trafficked just as much as Asians or Russians are. 

Virginia as a source of human trafficking

A few cases show the glimpse of the truth behind Virginia as a source of human trafficking:

In October 2009,  police arrested a man who recruited two minors for forced prostitution in Virginia. The two minors were recruited from the state of Virginia, where they were forced into prostitution. The man promised the minors that if they “would serve as prostitutes in Virginia, for a short period of time, they and he would earn enough money to go to Florida for an extravagant vacation.”  As soon as they arrived in Florida, the Virginia minors were also forced into prostitution to pay for hotels, food, and other items. 

In July 2007, A 15 year old girl was taken from a group home in Virginia. She was advertised on Craigslist and forced into prostitution. She was rescued through a software program developed a few years later. 

 And these are, of course, only two cases in addition to numerous examples of sex trafficking in massage parlors and other cases in Northern Virginia. 

Awareness raising is essential

 Some people may argue that human trafficking, apart from Northern Virginia, does not happen in the state because they do not hear about it on the local newspaper. However, this is not to say that children in Virginia are immune from the danger of being trafficked out of the state. Pimps may not choose to sell children in the middle of cornfield in Virginia. But, pimps will, as they certainly have, recruit children in Virginia and force them into prostitution in bigger cities outside of the state. The cases mentioned above therefore are only a reminder that awareness raising effort to protect Virginia children becomes more vital. So, what can you do to educate public and law enforcement authorities to protect Virginia children from being trafficked out of the state? 

source: http://www.examiner.com/x-24740-Human-Rights-Examiner~y2010m8d10-Virginia-awareness-raising-effort-for-minor-sex-trafficking-is-vital

Why Is Thailand a Hub for Child Sex Tourism?

The city of Pattaya, Thailand, never intended for a pillar of their economy to be foreign men buying sex with children. Nor did they intended to become world-famous as a playground for pedophiles. And they certainly didn’t expect to see celebrities arrested on their streets for sex crimes. So how, then, did this small Thai city become the world capitol of child sex trafficking?

In Pattaya alone, there are an estimated 2,000 children involved in the prostitution industry year round, with an additional 900 or so traveling to the area for tourist season each year. These children are, for the most part, controlled by someone else, like a family member, a brothel owner, or a pimp. In addition to being deprived of an education, children in the sex industry are at increased risk for contracting HIV and other STDs, rape, and physical assault. Survivors of child sex trafficking are marred for years by the physical and emotional scars of their abuse.

Thailand, in general, and Pattaya specifically have become notorious for their child sex tourism industry through a combination of social, political, and economic circumstances. In Thailand, there is a massive wealth gap between the elite of the country and the populous, many of whom are very poor. The lack of social services and support for poor families and homeless children means there are few ways to get extra money other than prostitution. There has also been a long tradition of political corruption in Thailand, making it easy for pedophiles to buy their way out of trouble when caught with a child. As the availability of children and the laxity of law enforcement became known, Thailand grew as a destination for men seeking sex, and the child sex tourism industry grew in response.

Now, especially in areas like Pattaya, the money (spent at hotels, bars, restaurants, etc.) brought in by people traveling to Thailand for sex with children is a major component of the local economy. These factors can lead to a culture of tolerance for child sex tourism, which exists in many parts of Thailand.

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Welcome to the flesh market

 

There is a law that can hold criminals accountable for their crimes in trafficking children for sexual exploitation. But Malaysia is one of three countries in Southeast Asia that hasn’t signed this Protocol. What are you going to do about it? 

Once upon a time, we wished for our younger siblings to be gone. We wanted them out of our lives, and wished they would disappear so we could have our own rooms or never have to pick up after their mess again or even keep an eye on them all the time.

But what would happen if they really went missing? Would you ever forgive yourself for your secret wish if you found out that they had suddenly vanished because they were among the 1.2 million children trafficked for sexual abuse and exploitation every single year?

Of course you wouldn’t want that! The level of annoyance of your pesky sibling could never amount to wanting any physical injury to befall them, even if you did say or think of some really mean things that you wished would happen to them in your many moments of rage.

However much money you said you’d gladly part with, just to have someone take him or her away, it would never have crossed your mind for your brother or sister – no matter how irritating, mischievous or painful – to be part of a staggering 79 per cent of US$27 billion, gleaned from the sexual exploitation of children.

In the end, while you sometimes can’t even stand the sight of your brother or sister, you’d never wish for them to be kidnapped, raped, beaten, tortured and violated sexually or turned into the object of some pedophiles’ lust, because deep down, you know you care for them deeply.

 Blood is thicker than water and because of this, you know that you would even fight to protect them. And this is why, as youths, you must also be aware of the uphill battle we all face against child sex trafficking. It is your war too.

The State of Things

Just last month, Malaysia was upgraded to Tier 2 from Tier 3 in the United States Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report, showing recognition of the efforts of the government to fight illicit trafficking.

And even more recently, the penalties of human trafficking were increased 10-fold, showing a move in the right direction to deter and curb this crime against humanity.

But despite all that, Malaysia is still one of only three countries in South East Asia who have not signed on to the Optional Protocols (Articles 34 and 35) in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) – a shocking fact, for these protocols are crucial in putting precedence on the rights and protection of children victimised by sexual trafficking.

What is Child Sex Trafficking, and what are the Optional Protocols?

The definition of trafficking of children is: “the movement of a child (anyone under 18) for the purpose of exploitation is considered trafficking, even if it doesn’t involve coercion.”

Sexual exploitation of a child for commercial purposes is sex trafficking, and often, sex trafficking is for any or all of these purposes: child pornography, child prostitution, child brides and child sex tourism.

This is where the Optional Protocols come in to protect children against such crimes.

According to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), Articles 34 and 35 of the CRC state that the government should protect children from all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse and take all measures possible to ensure that they are not abducted, sold or trafficked. In this protocol, it is made compulsory to criminalise these offenses. This Optional Protocol strikes hard on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, and is to supplement the Convention, and to provide detailed requirements to end sexual abuse and exploitation of children.

What Now?

But Malaysia is not bound by these Optional Protocols. Malaysian children are at great risk of sexual exploitation with little to no consequence to the monsters who are responsible.

 “So many Malaysians are appalled at the crime of the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, yet no concrete action is undertaken,” said Noreen Proseeur, Training and Education Director of P.S. The Children. “The Optional Protocol, once ratified, will be a solid platform to advocate for meaningful child protection with respect to the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.”

The Optional Protocol (to the CRC on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography) reinforces and extends the duty of the government to initiate protection measures relating to the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, explained Nooreen.

“It is a lack of political initiative that stops the government from signing to these protocols – they don’t deem it important,” she said. “The government is only looking into human trafficking, but much more still needs to be done to stop child sex trafficking.”

After all, said Noreen, raising fines is not a deterrent for criminals involved in multi-billion dollar crimes.

“The sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography is mostly syndicate oriented. Many of the individuals caught by law enforcement agents are “small fry”,” she said. “The arrest and prosecution of the syndicate leaders will require the unwavering commitment of all stakeholders, effective judiciary measures including a strong legal framework, adequate training for the judiciary and enforcement agents, inter-agency collaboration as well as inter-regional co-operation.”

“Malaysia needs a well-thought-out strategic plan to deal with this issue and not have knee jerk reactions just to get ourselves from Tier 3 to Tier 2,” added P.S. The Children director, Madeleine Yong. “It’s more than that: There needs to be prevention; managing of investigations, prosecution of perpetrators and protecting and assisting children in their recovery.”

Taking Action

One organisation taking matters into their hands is The Body Shop, who in collaboration with their non-governmental organisation (NGO) partners, are embarking upon their second year of their campaign against child sex trafficking.

Last year, The Body Shop launched their ‘Stop Sex Trafficking of Children and Young People’ campaign with the aim of creating awareness of this highly secretive and lucrative crime, urging the people to face the facts: Malaysia is a destination, transit and more shockingly, source country for trafficking, with an estimated 90 children getting trafficked every month.

This year, they are pushing even harder for the signing of the Optional Protocols – and the reason is clear.

“Child pornography is an extremely grave concern, now more so than ever. Technology has made it so easy to film a child for pornographic purposes; times have moved on and so has technology,” said The Body Shop MD, Datin Mina Cheah-Foong. “You can do so much more that you could not do before. It’s as easy as installing a spy camera in a kindergarten, for instance, and the pictures get circulated all over the world among pedophiles!”

So the Optional Protocols are to protect our children against just that, and to hold the perpetrators responsible and punishable for their actions.

“It’s shocking: There was a case overseas where a childcare centre caretaker was selling pictures of toddlers and young children under the pretense of changing their diapers! These are such instances that the Optional Protocol steps in.”

Credit must be given where credit is due, she said, for the government has taken many steps to fight human trafficking.

“This is just one more step to take. As it is, we are signatories for the CRC, so it is also to ensure that the law protects against child pornography.” The best example of this is the recent case of three-year-old Nicole Soo Siew Ching, who was abducted by her own father on June 26.

“Her frantic mother believed that Nicole had been taken to be sold by her father, to cover his gambling debt! But these protocols specifically make provisions to make his actions a crime, and not just a family dispute. This means that as soon as her mother lodges a report, it makes it a crime that the police are obliged to investigate, instead of her mother being told to go to the courts and apply for a court order to compel the father to return the child.”

It is to ensure that the government is obliged to actively do all within its power to recover a missing or abducted child, added Cheah-Foong. “It means more work, but it is the responsibility of the government! This is why we’re calling for the government to ratify it and include it into the CRC. This is why we’re working with our NGO partners to ensure that no matter what, there will be somebody who will never give up looking for the missing child.”

Why Should the Youth Care?

 “Everybody is someone’s somebody.” Your sister, your brother, your niece, nephew or cousin – when somebody goes missing, the effects are devastating.

“Not only that, the youth are getting trafficked too. It could be you – but you’d never think of it. When you’re young, you feel invincible,” said Cheah-Foong. “You always think that the bad things never happen to you, it only happens to somebody else. You say: I’m aware, I’m street-smart. But if not you, then somebody you know and somebody you care about.”

 “Truth be told, the newly amended fines are just not enough. What is RM 500,000 in a multi-billion US dollar industry? It’s pocket change! But the death penalty (the penalty of convicted drug trafficking) is not a true deterrent either.”

What she believes will be a true deterrent to child traffickers is what is called ‘Fruits from a Poisoned Tree’, where any material gains that have been acquired during the duration of involvement in trafficking is to be confiscated  – whether those gains were as a direct result of trafficking or from legitimate means.”

“A lot of traffickers have legitimate fronts. They need it to conduct their trafficking business. As it is, the government has laws that seize illegally gained assets. Why not extend it? I personally don’t believe in the death penalty – a criminal can only die once.”

What Can You Do?

In light of that, The Body Shop has made it their pledge to continue to urge for the ratification of the Optional Protocols, and simultaneously raise funds for their NGO partners with the sale of the Soft Hands, Kind Hearts hand cream (RM 39.90), where net proceeds will go to the NGOs directly. Working also hand in hand with INTI College, they are planning a march to raise awareness along the busiest street in KL, Jalan Bukit Bintang, at a yet-to-be-confirmed date.

In addition to that, you can sign the petition for the ratification of the CRC and the inclusion of the Optional Protocols at all Body Shop outlets nationwide.

There is still much to be done to protect our children from being sold to the highest bidder. There is a long way to go before child prostitution and pornography is crushed and defeated. And it begins now: As soon as you put down this paper and head out to tell somebody you know about the Optional Protocols. Because if knowledge is power, then we ourselves will be the most powerful weapon against the monsters of child sex trafficking.

 
Source URL: http://malaysiantoday.com.my/node/1605